About

Bio

Jaime Murdoch is a Salt Spring Island-based textile artist who uses traditional textile techniques to transform everyday detritus objects and material into works of art.  Jaime graduated from Bishop’s University in 2003 with a BA in Liberal Arts and went on to earn a Diploma in Textile Arts from Capilano University from 2008-2010. In between degrees, Jaime spent time in Japan and was inspired by a brush with the textile traditions of Kyoto. She has exhibited her work in Vancouver, Deep Cove, Port Moody and on Salt Spring Island where she has co-hosted a community recycled art show for the past two years.  She has also worked with artist Anna Gustafson and Helene Day Fraser, Associate Professor at Emily Carr, in a design charette at the Point Gallery, also on Salt Spring.

 

Jaime was raised in Cumberland, BC with a free store in her household and an awareness of the local landfill.  From a very young age, she knew of the overabundance of clothing and objects. As a child, Jaime enjoyed being creative with the materials that were at hand. To this day she employs the skills she learned at home, school and abroad to turn discarded t-shirts, personal love letters, rope that has washed ashore, dryer lint, produce packaging and other refuse into textile art that carries meaning in its function and form.

 

Artist Statement

My medium consists of the objects in excess that I find around me. I see potential in all types of everyday life trappings, like twist ties and plastic from the grocery store, rubber gloves from my workplace and worn out or never-worn t-shirts.  Where a painter uses pots of paint, I dip my brush into piles of colourful cotton, plastic bits and rugged twine. 

 

Deconstructing the objects and organizing them by colour and texture are integral steps in the process of my work. Once pulled apart, I infuse new life into the material by way of weaving, sewing or applique.  In other works, I choose a hue and prepare a dye bath before assemblage takes place.  Deconstruction-reconstruction is my practice.

 

“Taking what was once discarded and transforming it with artistry and technique communicates a message of slowing down and preservation in a world quickened with a frenzy of consumption and discard,” says Murdoch.

 

I am not strictly a seamstress, a weaver, an embroiderer, a felt artist or a quilter. I am a maker and I like to start the creative process where I am with what is before me. I encourage others to do the same. This method is raw, can be functional, inspirational, innovative, and best of all, it is accessible. 

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Artist Statement

 My medium consists of the objects in excess that I find around me. I see potential in all types of everyday life trappings, like twist ties and plastic from the grocery store, rubber gloves from my workplace and worn out or never-worn t-shirts.  Where a painter uses pots of paint, I dip my brush into piles of colourful cotton, plastic bits and rugged twine. 

Deconstructing the objects and organizing them by colour and texture are integral steps in the process of my work. Once pulled apart, I infuse new life into the material by way of weaving, sewing or applique.  In other works, I choose a hue and prepare a dye bath before assemblage takes place.  Deconstruction-reconstruction is my practice.

 “Taking what was once discarded and transforming it with artistry and technique communicates a message of slowing down and preservation in a world quickened with a frenzy of consumption and discard,” says Murdoch.

I am not strictly a seamstress, a weaver, an embroiderer, a felt artist or a quilter. I am a maker and I like to start the creative process where I am with what is before me. I encourage others to do the same. This method is raw, can be functional, inspirational, innovative, and best of all, it is accessible. 

Jaime Murdoch lives and works on Salt Spring Island BC Canada.

Biography 

Jaime Murdoch is a Salt Spring Island-based textile artist who uses traditional textile techniques to transform everyday detritus objects and material into works of art.  Jaime graduated from Bishop’s University in 2003 with a BA in Liberal Arts and went on to earn a Diploma in Textile Arts from Capilano University from 2008-2010. In between degrees, Jaime spent time in Japan and was inspired by a brush with the textile traditions of Kyoto. She has exhibited her work in Vancouver, Deep Cove, Port Moody and on Salt Spring Island where she has co-hosted a community recycled art show for the past two years.  She has also worked with artist Anna Gustafson and Helene Day Fraser, Associate Professor at Emily Carr, in a design charette at the Point Gallery, also on Salt Spring.

Jaime was raised in Cumberland, BC with a free store in her household and an awareness of the local landfill.  From a very young age, she knew of the overabundance of clothing and objects. As a child, Jaime enjoyed being creative with the materials that were at hand. To this day she employs the skills she learned at home, school and abroad to turn discarded t-shirts, personal love letters, rope that has washed ashore, dryer lint, produce packaging and other refuse into textile art that carries meaning in its function and form.

C.V.

the 6th Annual Creatively United for the Planet is happening at the Royal BC Museum on April 22. The event will feature innovators & change makers in action! Creative Up-cycling workshop, Ann Mortifee, Pauline Le Bel, Electric Vehicle Show & Symposiums. www.creativelyunited.org